Playing with the Channel.

“Should I breathe through my mouth or my nose?” “Is there a right way to breathe?”

Let’s look at the possibilities that are open to us.

We can breathe in and out through the nose.

We can breathe in one nostril and out the other nostril.

We can breathe in and out through the mouth.

When we breathe in and out the mouth…

we can give the breath an “ahh” shape, an “oh shape, an “ooh” shape, an “eee” shape.

We can breathe in the nose and out the mouth.

We can breathe in the mouth and out the nose.

We can breathe in and out both the mouth and nose at the same time.

Can you think of any other options, combinations, or possibilities?

Are there times when you deliberately or automatically use one of these options? Do you know of any reason to use one channel versus another? (Hint: Have you ever tried to laugh or cry while breathing through your nose?)

Begin to notice your own habits and patterns. Watch how others breathe when they are talking. In between words, do they breathe through their mouth or their nose? And you?

EXERCISE

Practice breathing in these various ways describe above. Experiment.

What happens inside of you as you practice different options?

Which ways feel natural to you?

Which ways are easy, which are challenging?

Which are most enjoyable? Which feel really pleasurable, or fun?

Maybe instead of Breathwork, we should call it Breathplay!

It is through play, that as children, we learned the most.

Be playful with your breathing. Play is nature’s way!

PRACTITIONERS NOTE: Remember, different breath sounds/shapes activate different energies and emotions, and they stimulate different organs and systems.Breathing through the nose tends to activate subtle channels in the head, and breathing through the mouth tends to activate body channels.We use mouth breathing in some sessions to heal the breathing mechanism and to wash away an over-active stress response.We use the classic “oooh” on the inhale and “aaah” on the exhale, to quickly go deep into the process.